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Dane County Awards Communities Over $900,000 in Grants for Clean Water Projects

For more information contact:

Stephanie Miller 608-267-8823

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 9/7/2017

Issued By: County Executive
View only releases from County Executive

Today, Dane County Executive Joe Parisi announced six awards totaling $911,574 to local municipalities aimed at cleaning up urban runoff pollution in area waters. The grants help local communities construct stormwater management facilities.  These basins capture trash and phosphorus-laden debris such as yard or pet waste from urban areas that would otherwise wash directly into area lakes and streams during heavy rains or snow melt. These types of investments are especially important given the increase in flooding events due to climate change. A resolution verifying the grant amounts will be introduced at tonight’s County Board meeting.

 

“By working with local communities, we are able to more robustly stop pollutants from entering our waters,” said Dane County Executive Joe Parisi. “These projects further the county’s effort in assuring our lakes, rivers, and streams stay healthy for many years to come.”

 

Since starting the grant program in 2005, Dane County has helped fund 59 projects totaling nearly $13 million. These partnerships have stopped the flow of over 830,000 pounds of garbage and pollutants, including over 3,000 pounds of phosphorus. Phosphorus is the main culprit causing algae growth in area lakes. Every pound of phosphorus removed from the county’s watershed prevents 500 pounds of algae from growing.

 

This grant program is one of many initiatives by Dane County to clean up our lakes. As part of Dane County Executive Parisi’s 2017 budget, a lakes clean up breakthrough was announced that will result in clean lakes decades sooner. The $12 million, 4 year project will clean up 33 miles of streams that feed phosphorus directly in the lakes on a daily basis. The work will remove 870,000 pounds of phosphorus, the chief culprit responsible for algae growth, from area waters.

 

The following projects are receiving funding:

 

The Town of Middleton will be awarded $189,074 to construct a wet detention pond and infiltration basin for the Prairie Home Estates neighborhood. The project will stop 52 lbs. of phosphorus and 11,622 lbs. of sediment per year from entering our lakes. The total cost of the project is $252,098.

 

The City of Madison will be awarded $100,000 to convert existing sections of the Rimrock Greenway into a wet pond. The project will stop 46 lbs. of phosphorus and 24,119 lbs. of sediment per year from entering our lakes. The total cost of the project is $212,000.

 

The City of Madison will be awarded $100,000 to construct a screen structure at Wingra Park. The project will stop 36 lbs. of phosphorus and 14,144 lbs. of sediment per year from entering our lakes. The total cost of the project is $350,000.

 

The City of Madison will be awarded $100,000 to fund the Nautilus Pond Retrofit Project. It will stop 91 lbs. of phosphorus and 22,176 lbs. of sediment per year from entering our lakes. The total cost of the project is $450,000.

 

The City of Madison will be awarded $85,000 to add an iron enhanced biofilter and other improvements to the Sauk Creek Greenway. The project will stop 91 lbs. of phosphorus and 2,370 lbs. of sediment per year from entering our lakes. The total cost of the project is $170,000.

 

The City of Madison will be awarded $337,500 to complete the Jacobson-Furey Pond Project. Construction will include adding two stormwater retention ponds near Starkweather Creek. The project will stop 13 lbs. of phosphorus and 7,745 lbs. of sediment per year from entering our lakes. The total cost of the project is $450,000.

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